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Thirteen of the Best Shoe Shopping Stores in New York City

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Welcome to Shoe Week: a five-day celebration of all things footwear, from the best new arrivals to our favorite places to shop for heels, flats, and everything in between.


Image via Nicholas Kirkwood

Navigating this town can often require a lot of footwork, quite literally. To find shoes that are man enough to take your 8am to 8pm—or wild enough to turn your 11pm into 5am—is no small feat (pun narrowly avoided). That's why we've rounded up thirteen of the best shoe stores for all walks of NYC life.

For day-to-day running around, we'd point you towards No. 6 for their namesake clog booties, or Dolce Vita for affordable flats that last. A big night out may warrant a splurge at Charlotte Olympia, reigning queen of the contrast platform. After the jump, all the stores you need to know to stock your walk-in shoe closet and/or kitchen cupboards.


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Charlotte Olympia

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You won't find many basic pumps at designer Charlotte Olympia Dellal's first New York City outpost: instead, expect elaborately printed platforms, embroidered smoking slippers, and currently, a cosmic collection for all signs of the zodiac. The selection rotates frequently, so if kitty flats aren't your thing, keep checking back. [Photo]
The Brazilian brand is making their mark on Madison Avenue with colorful kicks. From sky-high pumps to sneaker wedges, prices range from $125 to $300. (You could certainly do a lot worse on the UES.) Head here for shoes that use party as a verb. [Photo]

Nicholas Kirkwood

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Nicholas Kirkwood's Meatpacking boutique, which comes complete with an outdoor garden and plenty of heels that run upwards of $1,000, is the designer's first in the U.S. The merchandise includes Kirkwood's seasonal collections of architectural heels with laser-cut details, as well as the brand's frequent collaborations.

Christian Louboutin

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Barneys and Bergdorf may also have them, but there's no better place to shop for Louboutin's ubiquitous red bottoms than the brand's own boutiques, which include a men's store right around the corner and another on Madison Avenue. [Photo]

Pierre Hardy

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The Parisian designer is known for graphic details—think geometric squares and colorblocking. Inspired by architecture, his shoes are artful and confident—but make no mistake, these heels are sexy. Prices are definitely in the designer tier, so anticipate dropping some serious dough. [Photo]

Jean Michel Cazabat

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Sexy and colorful, head to the intimate boutique for heels that steal the show. The designer's styles are on-trend without beating you over the head about it. While the shoes look super expensive, most of them retail under $300—cha-ching. [Photo]
Leffot sells hip but sturdy men's shoes from brands like Alden and Wolverine under the watchful eye of owner Steven Taffel, who seems to know everything there is to know about men's footwear. Only drawback: The prices, but then, perfection doesn't come cheap.

United Nude

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Even United Nude's most basic styles come with a little touch of the nontraditional—think ballet flats with small block heels, wedges that resemble a Möbius band, mosaic peep-toes, and pumps with chair feet. Similarly, the brand's Bond Street flagship is a piece of art in and of itself. [Photo]

Galeria Melissa

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Jelly-shoe lovers take heed: Sao Paulo-based Melissa offers up plastic styles in adult appropriate silhouettes, like wedges and heels. They also love a guest designer, and counts Jason Wu, Vivienne Westwood, and Gareth Pugh among past collaborators. The (probably) water-proof shoes won't break your bank balance, either: basic flats are around $65 and a simple heel goes for $150. [Photo]

Dolce Vita

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Almost one year ago today, Dolce Vita departed its longtime storefront on Ludlow Street for a shop on trendier Elizabeth. The newish space stocks footwear from the regular, DV8, and DV by Dolce Vita collections, as well as women's clothing to match.

Kathryn Amberleigh

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The skinny, white space is the New York designer's first store (she's since opened a second in Meatpacking), displaying her designs unpretentiously. With a good amount of variety to the styles, it feels like you're picking up something that's one-of-a-kind. Prices are generally over $200 but under $400. [Photo]
The clog boot you see on every Cobble Hill mommy? Here's who you have to thank for that. The stock does extend beyond the brand's signature bootie: sandals—built on the same wooden heel—and wedges will cost you under $300 and get you around the city all summer. [Photo]

Shoe Market

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Perfectly straddling the line between on-trend and "I can actually manage walking two miles in these," Shoe Market probably is stocking your next wear-every-day shoes right this second. Prices are pleasantly affordable, with styles ranging from under $100 to about $450. Ladies can expect to find brands like Rachel Comey, Senso, and 80%20; guys can pick up Clae, Camper, and Bed Stu. [Photo]

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Charlotte Olympia

You won't find many basic pumps at designer Charlotte Olympia Dellal's first New York City outpost: instead, expect elaborately printed platforms, embroidered smoking slippers, and currently, a cosmic collection for all signs of the zodiac. The selection rotates frequently, so if kitty flats aren't your thing, keep checking back. [Photo]

Schutz

The Brazilian brand is making their mark on Madison Avenue with colorful kicks. From sky-high pumps to sneaker wedges, prices range from $125 to $300. (You could certainly do a lot worse on the UES.) Head here for shoes that use party as a verb. [Photo]

Nicholas Kirkwood

Nicholas Kirkwood's Meatpacking boutique, which comes complete with an outdoor garden and plenty of heels that run upwards of $1,000, is the designer's first in the U.S. The merchandise includes Kirkwood's seasonal collections of architectural heels with laser-cut details, as well as the brand's frequent collaborations.

Christian Louboutin

Barneys and Bergdorf may also have them, but there's no better place to shop for Louboutin's ubiquitous red bottoms than the brand's own boutiques, which include a men's store right around the corner and another on Madison Avenue. [Photo]

Pierre Hardy

The Parisian designer is known for graphic details—think geometric squares and colorblocking. Inspired by architecture, his shoes are artful and confident—but make no mistake, these heels are sexy. Prices are definitely in the designer tier, so anticipate dropping some serious dough. [Photo]

Jean Michel Cazabat

Sexy and colorful, head to the intimate boutique for heels that steal the show. The designer's styles are on-trend without beating you over the head about it. While the shoes look super expensive, most of them retail under $300—cha-ching. [Photo]

Leffot

Leffot sells hip but sturdy men's shoes from brands like Alden and Wolverine under the watchful eye of owner Steven Taffel, who seems to know everything there is to know about men's footwear. Only drawback: The prices, but then, perfection doesn't come cheap.

United Nude

Even United Nude's most basic styles come with a little touch of the nontraditional—think ballet flats with small block heels, wedges that resemble a Möbius band, mosaic peep-toes, and pumps with chair feet. Similarly, the brand's Bond Street flagship is a piece of art in and of itself. [Photo]

Galeria Melissa

Jelly-shoe lovers take heed: Sao Paulo-based Melissa offers up plastic styles in adult appropriate silhouettes, like wedges and heels. They also love a guest designer, and counts Jason Wu, Vivienne Westwood, and Gareth Pugh among past collaborators. The (probably) water-proof shoes won't break your bank balance, either: basic flats are around $65 and a simple heel goes for $150. [Photo]

Dolce Vita

Almost one year ago today, Dolce Vita departed its longtime storefront on Ludlow Street for a shop on trendier Elizabeth. The newish space stocks footwear from the regular, DV8, and DV by Dolce Vita collections, as well as women's clothing to match.

Kathryn Amberleigh

The skinny, white space is the New York designer's first store (she's since opened a second in Meatpacking), displaying her designs unpretentiously. With a good amount of variety to the styles, it feels like you're picking up something that's one-of-a-kind. Prices are generally over $200 but under $400. [Photo]

No.6

The clog boot you see on every Cobble Hill mommy? Here's who you have to thank for that. The stock does extend beyond the brand's signature bootie: sandals—built on the same wooden heel—and wedges will cost you under $300 and get you around the city all summer. [Photo]

Shoe Market

Perfectly straddling the line between on-trend and "I can actually manage walking two miles in these," Shoe Market probably is stocking your next wear-every-day shoes right this second. Prices are pleasantly affordable, with styles ranging from under $100 to about $450. Ladies can expect to find brands like Rachel Comey, Senso, and 80%20; guys can pick up Clae, Camper, and Bed Stu. [Photo]