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The 'Mad Men' Map of Manhattan: 12 Spots to Visit Before the Series Ends

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As fans (and everyone else with an internet connection) certainly know, Mad Men is coming to an end. Starting this Sunday, AMC will begin airing its final seven episodes, but if you've noticed, the show is going out with a pretty big bang—there's a Mad Men-themed statue at the Time-Life Building and along with a film series, there's an entire exhibit devoted to the show at the Museum of the Moving Image.

There's no better time to be nostalgic about the looming finale, which is why we've put together a tour of NYC that'll bring you back at all your favorite Mad Men moments, from Sally and Glen's escape to the natural history museum, Pete's humiliating Bloomingdale's run, and Roger vomiting oysters and martinis. Beware of plot spoilers ahead if you're not caught up with the series (related: what've you been doing for the past eight years?).

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American Museum of Natural History

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The best couple on Mad Men was never Don and Megan or Pete and Peggy (yup, we're going there). It was Glen and Sally, of course, and the American Museum of Natural History was the site of a particularly romantic meet-up in which Sally skips school to meet him—before she gets her period in the bathroom and ditches, that is. [Photo]

Paul Mole Barber Shop

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Speaking of Pete, this barbershop founded in 1913 is responsible for that particular prep-school side part of his. [Photo]

The Pierre

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The titillatingly titled "Shut the Door. Have A Seat." season three finale involves Betty not only filing for divorce from Don, but also the unveiling of Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce. After raiding the original Sterling Cooper Offices, the new firm temporarily works out of a suite at the Pierre Hotel. [Photo]

Bloomingdale's

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In season one, Pete must undergo the humiliation of running a domestic errand as a married man in the early 60s. He returns this Chip 'n' Dip (a novel concept back then) to the Bloomingdale's flagship after receiving it as a wedding present, and when the cute store clerk won't let him return it without a receipt, Pete attempts to flirt his way out of it. Like most things in Pete's life, it does not go well. [Photo]

Time-Life Building

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The very groovy Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce offices take up two floors of the Time-Life Building—which is also the current site of this bench, built in the shape of Don's shadow in the opening credit sequence. [Photo: Getty]

The Waldorf Astoria

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When the Glo-Coat ad gets nominated for a Clio Award, the ceremony is held here—and though they win, the rest of the episode (like most Mad Men episodes) is far from cheery. But on a sillier note, it's also the episode where we find out that Don used to work as an store attendant at the (sadly fictional) Heller's Luxury Furs. [Photo]

Grand Central Oyster Bar

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After Roger makes an awkward, drunken pass at Betty in season one, Don takes him here for lunch, but not just any lunch—a revenge lunch. Don eggs him on to keep drinking before a big client meeting, then forces him to walk up 23 flights of stairs, causing Roger to vomit up oysters and martinis in front of everyone. [Photo]

William Greenberg Desserts

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During a house party at Pete's new suburban home in Cos Cob, Connecticut, Megan hands him a tin from this hundred-year-old Upper East Side bakery, causing Pete to display one of his most stellar bitchfaces. "Tweety, look what they brought," he says, "Doesn’t it make you homesick?" [Photo]

New York Athletic Club

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During one of Don Draper's precious few upbeat moments post-split from Betty, he swims a couple contemplative laps at the storied New York Athletic Club on Central Park South. Afterwards, he goes on a date with Anna Camp—sorry, Bethany—during which he sees Betty and Henry. Horrifying. [Photo]

P.J. Clarke's

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After Peggy scores the Belle Jolie gig, she and the Sterling Cooper gang head to P.J. Clarke's for a drink. And in one of season one's most heartbreaking moments, Peggy dances happily to "The Twist," and Pete simply snarls, "I don't like you like this." [Photo]

Minetta Tavern

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Poor, idealistic Abe proposes that he and Peggy move in together on a romantic date to this West Village staple—which was unfortunately not the kind of proposal Peggy was expecting. [Photo]

The Slipper Room

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And in our final stop on the Mad Men tour of New York City, we bring you all the way back to the pilot episode, "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes." Ken, Dick, Harry, Salvatore, and Pete hit up a burlesque show at the Lower East Side's Slipper Room—and you could do the same today. [Photo]

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American Museum of Natural History

The best couple on Mad Men was never Don and Megan or Pete and Peggy (yup, we're going there). It was Glen and Sally, of course, and the American Museum of Natural History was the site of a particularly romantic meet-up in which Sally skips school to meet him—before she gets her period in the bathroom and ditches, that is. [Photo]

Paul Mole Barber Shop

Speaking of Pete, this barbershop founded in 1913 is responsible for that particular prep-school side part of his. [Photo]

The Pierre

The titillatingly titled "Shut the Door. Have A Seat." season three finale involves Betty not only filing for divorce from Don, but also the unveiling of Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce. After raiding the original Sterling Cooper Offices, the new firm temporarily works out of a suite at the Pierre Hotel. [Photo]

Bloomingdale's

In season one, Pete must undergo the humiliation of running a domestic errand as a married man in the early 60s. He returns this Chip 'n' Dip (a novel concept back then) to the Bloomingdale's flagship after receiving it as a wedding present, and when the cute store clerk won't let him return it without a receipt, Pete attempts to flirt his way out of it. Like most things in Pete's life, it does not go well. [Photo]

Time-Life Building

The very groovy Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce offices take up two floors of the Time-Life Building—which is also the current site of this bench, built in the shape of Don's shadow in the opening credit sequence. [Photo: Getty]

The Waldorf Astoria

When the Glo-Coat ad gets nominated for a Clio Award, the ceremony is held here—and though they win, the rest of the episode (like most Mad Men episodes) is far from cheery. But on a sillier note, it's also the episode where we find out that Don used to work as an store attendant at the (sadly fictional) Heller's Luxury Furs. [Photo]

Grand Central Oyster Bar

After Roger makes an awkward, drunken pass at Betty in season one, Don takes him here for lunch, but not just any lunch—a revenge lunch. Don eggs him on to keep drinking before a big client meeting, then forces him to walk up 23 flights of stairs, causing Roger to vomit up oysters and martinis in front of everyone. [Photo]

William Greenberg Desserts

During a house party at Pete's new suburban home in Cos Cob, Connecticut, Megan hands him a tin from this hundred-year-old Upper East Side bakery, causing Pete to display one of his most stellar bitchfaces. "Tweety, look what they brought," he says, "Doesn’t it make you homesick?" [Photo]

New York Athletic Club

During one of Don Draper's precious few upbeat moments post-split from Betty, he swims a couple contemplative laps at the storied New York Athletic Club on Central Park South. Afterwards, he goes on a date with Anna Camp—sorry, Bethany—during which he sees Betty and Henry. Horrifying. [Photo]

P.J. Clarke's

After Peggy scores the Belle Jolie gig, she and the Sterling Cooper gang head to P.J. Clarke's for a drink. And in one of season one's most heartbreaking moments, Peggy dances happily to "The Twist," and Pete simply snarls, "I don't like you like this." [Photo]

Minetta Tavern

Poor, idealistic Abe proposes that he and Peggy move in together on a romantic date to this West Village staple—which was unfortunately not the kind of proposal Peggy was expecting. [Photo]

The Slipper Room

And in our final stop on the Mad Men tour of New York City, we bring you all the way back to the pilot episode, "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes." Ken, Dick, Harry, Salvatore, and Pete hit up a burlesque show at the Lower East Side's Slipper Room—and you could do the same today. [Photo]