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There's a Conspiracy Behind the Story of Beyoncé's Lucite Crib

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The Vetro (then called the Hollis) filled with Munny dolls. Image via <a href="http://blogs.babble.com/family-style/2010/10/13/yes-what-youre-looking-at-is-a-3000-acrylic-crib/">Babble</a>
The Vetro (then called the Hollis) filled with Munny dolls. Image via Babble

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Yesterday, Lenox Hill Hospital's executive director told the Daily News that he's investigating claims that Beyoncé and Jay-Z's security preventing seeing other parents from seeing their newborns. That's hardly the only controversy surrounding the birth of little Blue Ivy Carter, though. Turns out that Us Weekly story about Beyoncé's Lucite crib might be fishier than the Hudson River.

The blog Daddy Types breaks it down: Clearly, Us Weekly found out about the crib from a publicist. And since their item mentions the brand name NurseryWorks but not the store where the crib was allegedly purchased, NurseryWorks is probably the company paying that publicist's salary. But here's where the flack seems to have slipped up: The story mentions that "the singer also purchased a NurseryWorks mattress to fit the crib." But NurseryWorks doesn't make mattresses. Wheels within wheels, people.

Daddy Types has two more points to make, neither of which fully pertain to the Us Weekly story but both of which make NurseryWorks look bad. For one thing, it turns out NurseryWorks is owned by Bexco, also known as Million Dollar Baby, also known as Mdb, which—aha!—does make mattresses. However, the brand never shows those mattresses in their Lucite crib, presumably because they aren't pretty enough.

Secondly, and a lot more scandalously, NurseryWorks has gotten into the habit of promoting their crib by name-dropping Charles Hollis Jones, who Daddy Types describes as "a pioneering Southern California designer of Lucite furniture." They even called the crib "the Hollis" until a few months ago, when they abruptly changed the name to Vetro. Daddy Types contacted Jones, who said that he had nothing to do with the design. The blog doesn't confirm that Jones actually threatened to sue the company, but that's strongly implied. The moral of the story? This is one Lucite crib you probably shouldn't spend $3500 on. As opposed to all those other ones.
· Behold the Lucite Crib of Blue Ivy Carter [Racked NY]
· Lenox Hill Hospital investigates if Jay-Z and Beyonce's security kept other parents from maternity ward [NYDN]
· Unidentified Local Hack Buys PR Bullshit About NurseryWorks Lucite Crib [Daddy Types]