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RackedWire: Anthropologie's Trashy Windows; 7-Eleven Replaces Arnold Hatters; Dubai and Barneys

<a href="http://testofwill.blogspot.com/">Femia</a>, 11/30/09
Femia, 11/30/09

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FLATIRON DISTRICT—On trash day, Anthropologie's window displays look a lot less ethereal and a lot more, um, garbagey. You do hate to see that. [RackedWire]

MIDTOWN WEST—If you were trying to invent a story about the suburbanization of Manhattan, you couldn't come up with anything better than the sad tale of Arnold Hatters. The store, at 535 Eighth Avenue and 36th Street, survived three generations of family ownership before closing in June. "People need to eat," the final owner told Jeremiah's Vanishing New York. "So they're making do with last year's hat." Or they're spending their hat allowance on Slim Jims. Today, The Real Deal reports that the site's new tenant will be 7-Eleven. And that's just the beginning: The Slurpee-mongers plan to open 100 new stores in Manhattan over the next five years. [VNY; The Real Deal]

EVERYWHERE—Right now, financial experts are furiously debating what Dubai's financial crisis means for the future of the global economy—but what does it mean for Barneys? The department store is currently owned by Istithmar, the investment wing of Dubai's government. Luckily, the New York Post is on the case. Short answer: "Dubai's debt crisis could help push Barneys New York back into American hands by early next year—specifically, the clutches of New York hedge-fund tycoon Richard Perry and Los Angeles billionaire Ronald Burkle." Burkle likes to get involved in the management of his properties, so this could conceivably have a direct effect on your shopping experience. [NYP]